Embroidery Glossary

Embroidery Glossary

Bird names

There are 10 names in this directory beginning with the letter P.
Pantograph:
A bar, rack, or holder that frames or holding fixtures are attached to. The pantograph moves in X and Y directions to form the embroidery design, controlled electronically or mechanically depending on the machine.
Patches:
Made from twill fabric, patches have a merrowed edge and an adhesive back. Most embroidery shops don’t own a merrowing machine, so making patches from scratch isn’t an option, nor is it cost effective. One can still, however, supply them for the customer. Companies that specialize in making patches are plentiful, and the prices are much better than the average embroidery shop can manage. For the small odd jobs, though, blank patches are available in many shapes, colors and sizes.
Photo Stitch Designs:
Created from a scanned photo; the photograph is imported into the digitizing software, and with a few keystrokes the design is digitized and ready to sew. The possibilities for uses are endless, ranging from portraits to buildings. A series of run stitches and loose fills are used to replicate a photograph with cloth and thread. Photo stitch designs are popular with individuals and corporations.
Piqué:
A fabric of cotton or spun rayon woven lengthwise with raised cords.
Placket:
The opening of a shirt or jacket where the garment fastens or at a pocket. A reverse placket is the reversed opening for women’s garments.
Pre-tensioner:
Thread tension assemblies that are before the main tension assembly in the thread path. The function of the pre-tensioner is to apply a light amount of tension in order to make the main tensioner work.
Presser foot:
Metal device that touches the goods being embroidered while the needle is in the goods. The main function of the presser foot is to hold the material being embroidered until the hook point catches the thread loop formed by the needle rise.
Puckering:
Result of the fabric being gathered by the stitches due to its tension being less than that of the stitches. Many possible causes include incorrect density, loose hooping, lack of backing, incorrect tension or dull needle.
Puff Embroidery:
A technique popular in the early ’90s, and seems to be gaining popularity again. A special thick backing is placed in the hoop under the substrate, usually a sweatshirt. The design itself consists of light fill and blank spaces. The technique works great for names, with light fill separating letters that are negative. In the embroidery process, the blank spaces puff up and the area between them is flattened by the fill stitches.
Pull Compensation:
A degree of distortion built into a design by the digitizer to compensate for pull on the fabric caused by the embroidery stitches and to adjust for differences in stitch or line width driven by fabric differences.